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Katanning Landcare presents Black Cockatoo Crisis documentary to save beautiful species

Harry GrigsonGreat Southern Herald
Katanning Landcare project officer Annabel Paulley with an artificial nesting box.
Camera IconKatanning Landcare project officer Annabel Paulley with an artificial nesting box. Credit: Harry Grigson/Great Southern Herald

Katanning Landcare is set to host an insightful documentary screening of the Black Cockatoo Crisis as a prominent feature of their upcoming Bloom Festival celebrations.

With the strikingly beautiful Black Cockatoo teetering on the brink of extinction, Katanning Landcare is passionately urging all members of the public to view the screening.

Katanning Landcare Project Officer Annabel Paulley said the documentary is vitally important for people to understand the cockatoo’s significance to the region.

The movie will screen at 6pm inside Katanning Town Hall on October 8.
Camera IconThe movie will screen at 6pm inside Katanning Town Hall on October 8. Credit: Harry Grigson/Great Southern Herald

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“We have Carnaby’s cockatoos in Great Southern shires such as Katanning, Woodanilling and surrounds and they are found nowhere else in the world,” Ms Paulley said

“If they become extinct then that’s it — they’re gone.

“We have to try and do something to stop that because we’re losing too many native species right across Australia and in WA.”

Artificial nesting box being installed near Katanning.
Camera IconArtificial nesting box being installed near Katanning. Credit: Supplied

The 75-minute documentary will examine the factors contributing to the species’ decline and offer insights into how the public can play a vital role in their rejuvenation and conservation.

“It’s to raise awareness of what’s happening around the state that’s threatening their existence,” she said.

“But it’s also looking at what we can do as a community to stop that.”

After the documentary, the audience will be encouraged to engage in an open discussion of the best ways to get involved.

“We’ll be having a quick ‘q and a’ with the filmmaker Jane Hammond and also the Birdlife Australia cockatoo coordinator, Dr Sam Rycken,” she said.

“They’ll be giving people information about what they can do to get involved in restoration projects.

“One of these ways is artificial breading nesting boxes which we will have on display at the end of the film.”

The documentary will be played at the Katanning Town Hall on Sunday, October 8.

Doors will open at 5.30pm for a 6pm start and tickets can be bought by calling or texting 0477 042 653.

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